Success Stories

Success Stories: Managed Ponds: South San Francisco Bay Salt Pond Restoration

Managed Ponds: South San Francisco Bay Salt Pond Restoration

With the transfer of over 15,000 acres to public ownership in 2003, the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project is the largest wetland restoration on the West Coast. An early goal in the long-term restoration plan was to reduce salinity in open ponds from their inherited toxic production concentrations to those of ambient Bay waters. More »

Success Stories: Tidal Marsh: Carl's Marsh

Tidal Marsh: Carl's Marsh

Carl’s Marsh is a great example of successful tidal marsh restoration. After this 42-acre dry fallow field was breached in 1994, sediment began accumulating with each tidal cycle, and the site is now a lush tidal marsh supporting a diversity of birds including several endangered California Clapper Rails. This collab- orative project between California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG) and Sonoma Land Trust was more successful than expected. More »

Success Stories: Tidal Marsh Herons and Egrets: West Marin Island

Tidal Marsh Herons and Egrets: West Marin Island

The West Marin Island National Wildlife Refuge is a protected home to one of the largest nesting colonies of herons and egrets in San Francisco Bay, and is a true bird conservation success story. During the 1980s the Marin Islands were slated for development. Over the next 12 years, local citizens, and at least 17 other agencies and organizations participated in the establishment of the Marin Islands National Wildlife Refuge and State Ecological Reserve. More »

Success Stories: Human-created Habitats: Seabirds on Alcatraz Island

Human-created Habitats: Seabirds on Alcatraz Island

Prior to human settlement, Alcatraz Island was home to thousands of nesting seabirds, as indicated by the guano-covered sandstone. As early human settlement took place, birds left the island and did not return throughout the military and prison history. Over a century later, Alcatraz became part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), a unit of the National Park Service (NPS), and birds slowly began to return to reclaim the island. More »

Success Stories: Upland Habitats: Chileno Creek, Marin County

Upland Habitats: Chileno Creek, Marin County

Mike and Sally Gale are stewards of the land and quickly noticed that the creek running through their property, Chileno Creek, was completely lacking vegetation and drying out in the summer. The Gales recognized the need to revive Chileno Creek in order to retain soil and prevent creek sedimentation, keep evaporation in check, retain water, replenish groundwater, and provide better wildlife habitat. More »

Success Stories: Endangered Species: Spotted Owls

Endangered Species: Spotted Owls

For over 10 years, the National Park Service, Marin Municipal Water District, and Marin County Open Space have been conducting surveys on their lands to ensure that Northern Spotted Owls are not disturbed by management activities. Their commitment to the protection of Spotted Owls has resulted in better timing of management activities to avoid disturbance to nesting owls and increased knowledge about the status of Northern Spotted Owls in Marin County. More »

Success Stories: Endangered Species—Least Tern Watch: Monitoring and Protecting a California Least Tern Breeding Colony

Endangered Species—Least Tern Watch: Monitoring and Protecting a California Least Tern Breeding Colony

Tern Watch is a volunteer predator observation program at Alameda Point. The intention of Tern Watch is to give a broader picture of predator presence during the least tern breeding season, allowing USFWS to conduct proactive predator management. Annually, volunteers are recruited and trained to observe the tern colony from a vehicle outside the colony fence line, for three hours at a time. More »

Success Stories: Marshland on Reclaimed Shoreline: Sonoma Baylands

Marshland on Reclaimed Shoreline: Sonoma Baylands

Much of the historic marshland in the North Bay was diked from the Bay and drained in the late 19th century for farming oat hay and other crops. From 1991 to 1996, the State Coastal Conservancy and the Sonoma Land Trust conceived and developed the Sonoma Baylands Project to restore tidal marsh on 320 acres. This pioneering project of wetland creation used dredged materials from navigation channels to jump-start the restoration. More »